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  • What exactly happened in physics point of view that enabled us to create blue LEDs?

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This explanation is valuable in a sense that I have used my own knowledge without referring to external material, but of course it falls short on explaining what do I actually mean by the terms I have used such as “material” or “reliable” academically. So indeed, I have to provide exact definitions as reliable sources for what I am going to present.

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References:

  1. 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to inventors of blue LEDs. Retrieved May 15, 2015, from http://www.gizmag.com/blue-led-2014-nobel-prize-physics/34151/

  2. Why blue LEDs are worth a Nobel Prize. (2014, July). Retrieved May 19, 2015, from https://medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/why-blue-leds-are-worth-a-nobel-prize-2b5ff8c22803

        In the first reference, the author explains how LEDs actually produce light. As it states, on the contrary to other light sources, LED lighting is of kind “cold”, meaning that the light that is produced is not actually a result of heat but rather through the movement of current which results in the movement of electrons (from the layer that has excessive electrons ) toward holes (layer which lacks electrons) that cancel one another, and generate light in the end. The important concept though, is that it states “The wavelength of the light and hence its color is based on the materials used.”

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        In the second reference, it states that, the key to build LED is to find the right material to serve as a semiconductor in the diode. What is needed is a band gap that drops a specific amount in voltage and releases a specific wavelength of light when the electron finds its hole.

1-MumueBgdQQGYHS7N4Id47Q.pngImage Modified

Figure 1.1, taken from reference 2

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  • Are the current way of manufacturing blue LEDs is as efficient as possible?

  • What was preventing scientists to be able to commercially manufacturing LED appliances such as TVs until just the previous decade?

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References:

  1. 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to inventors of blue LEDs. Retrieved May 15, 2015, from http://www.gizmag.com/blue-led-2014-nobel-prize-physics/34151/

  2. Why blue LEDs are worth a Nobel Prize. (2014, July). Retrieved May 19, 2015, from https://medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/why-blue-leds-are-worth-a-nobel-prize-2b5ff8c22803